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Lectures

Lectures

  • "Laying it all out there: When a good looking layout is actually bad"
    by Kate Finan, co-owner of Boom Box Post.
    Excellent article by the people over at Boom Box Post about organizing our sound post sessions to make our lives more simple (and productive).
  • "Downstream: Valuable sound designers think like mixers"
    by Jeff Shifman, co-owner of Boom Box Post
    Another excellent article by the people over at Boom Box Post about organizing our sound post sessions to make our lives more simple (and productive).
  • "Speak volumes through well organized work"
    by Jeff Shifman, co-owner of Boom Box Post
    Another excellent article by the people over at Boom Box Post about organizing our sound post sessions to make our lives more simple (and productive).
  • "Ambiences for Film"
    by Tim Prebble
    Wonderful and very practical article by the great Tim Prebble, editor and sound designer, but also one of the most prolific ambience recordists of recent times. He talks a little about his current recoding setup, and the trial-and-error process that has led to his present workflow.
  • "Hands (and faces) across the table"
    by David Bordwell
    Very interesting article that proposes an overhaul of modern day filming and editing techniques, which the author refers to as a stylistic paradigm called “intensified continuity”. Against the backdrop of “chaos cinema”, Bordwell analyzes fragments from a number of movies in which he claims to find the essence of frame composition and blocking.
  • "Capturing the Sound of Bridge of Spies & Mad Max"
    by Kaleem Aftab, Richard Hymns, Drew Kunin, Gregg Rudloff and Mark Mangini
    The BAFTA-nominated sound teams behind “Bridge of Spies” and “Mad Max: Fury Road” discuss designing soundscapes, the practicalities of capturing sound and working with directors Steven Spielberg and George Miller.
  • "Whiplash"
    by Thomas Curley CAS
    It’s really quite astonishing to think that it only took nineteen days of principal photography and a tight budget of 3.3 million dollars to finish this incredible movie, which ended up winning the award for Best Sound Mixing at the 2015 Oscars. This article gives us a brief outlook on that process, originally published in the Summer 2015 issue of 695 Quarterly, a magazine published by the IATSE 695 (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada; 695 indicates one of its offices, based out of Los Angeles, California, USA).
    (I contacted the IATSE 695, owner of the copyright of this article, so I could publish it on my website. I did not receive a reply, so read it before it might have to be taken down!)
  • "House of Cards and Digital Boom Removal"
    by Lorenzo Millan
    Interesting and innovative methodological walkthrough on the use and digital removal of booms in the successful show House of Cards. The article was originally published in the Summer 2015 issue of 695 Quarterly, a magazine published by the IATSE 695 (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada; 695 indicates one of its offices, based out of Los Angeles, California, USA).
    (I contacted the IATSE 695, owner of the copyright of this article, so I could publish it on my website. I did not receive a reply, so read it before it might have to be taken down!)
  • "The Sound of Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)"
    by Thomas Varga
    Production sound mixer Thomas Varga recounts the many challenges and workarounds of Birdman, nominated for Best Sound Mixing at the 2015 Oscars. The article was originally published in the Summer 2015 issue of 695 Quarterly, a magazine published by the IATSE 695 (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada; 695 indicates one of its offices, based out of Los Angeles, California, USA).
    (I contacted the IATSE 695, owner of the copyright of this article, so I could publish it on my website. I did not receive a reply, so read it before it might have to be taken down!)
  • "Miking The Madness: Sound For MAD MAX FURY ROAD"
    by Chris Holder
    Sound recordist Ben Osmo spent six months in Namibia miking up trucks, explosions, mad mutterings, and collisions.
  • "The Editing of MAD MAX: Fury Road"
    by Vashi Nedomansky
  • "Footsteps with character: the art and craft of Foley"
    by Benjamin Wright
    A great essay written by Benjamin Wright, included in the Screen 55.2 Journal Summer 2014. Oxford Journals.
  • "Conversation about Foley with FX Supervisor Hanse Warns"
    by José Luis Díaz (2014)
    Please, read the emails exchange I had with Frank Kruse, Sound Designer of "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer" and with Hanse Warns, Foley Supervisor of the same film.
  • "A primer on inter- vs. intra-frame video compression"
    by Sam - Elemental Technologies (February 2008)
    One of the most confusing aspects of video compression seems to be inter- vs. intra-frame compression. Here' s a brief lesson on both.
  • "The Emperor's New Mix - Unveiling the stereo myth on live sound"
    by Bob McCarthy - Mix Magazine (January 1998)
    When I read this article I understood why the stereo image on a large living room and the stereo image on a movie theater are not the same. Even though the article talks about concerts, the conclusions are totally applicable to the film sound experience.
  • "FCP --> XML --> Pro Tools (Workflow between Final Cut and ProTools using XML)"
    by José Luis Díaz
    Two months before we started shooting Juan José Campanella´s film "The Secret in their Eyes", we had to make lots of tests to get to an efficient workflow between Final Cut and ProTools using XML. What we have learned is expressed in this article.
  • "Designing a Movie for Sound"
    by Randy Thom (1999)
    The biggest myth about composing and designing sound is that they are about creating great sounds. Not true, or at least not true enough.
  • "A solution to a sound post-production problem on feature films in PAL's world"
    by José Luis Díaz
    This method resolves a lack of perfect synch, evidenced in the current sound post-production processes, from digital cut or positive transfer to the final copy, including VHS and DVD versions. This methodic proposal doesn´t involves radical changes in the flux or the working way. But it offers certainly of repeatable and exact synchs.
  • "Stretching sound to help the mind see"
    by Walter Murch
    NYT October 1, 2000. This article was adapted from \"Sound Design: The Dancing Shadow\", an article that appeared in Projections 4.
  • "Dense Clarity - Clear Density"
    by Walter Murch
    This conference was dictated by Walter Murch in two opportunities. The first one in the Escuela Internacional de Cine y TV de San Antonio de los Baños, Cuba, in April of 1989. The last one in the Edinburgh Film Festival in August of 1995.
  • "The Secret Life of Audio Crossfades"
    by Andy Somers
    Since this information is not widely covered, I think it is particularly useful for most picture and sound editors.
  • "On Set Noise Investigation"
    by The Association of Motion Picture Sound
    In response to complaints from Production Sound members regarding on set noise problems that inhibit the recording of usable sound and cause undue stress on sound crews, AMPS called a meeting of members to discuss the matter and offer solutions.
  • "Production Sound Essentials (Or How Eggs should be Sucked)"
    by Robert Allen
    Robert Allen's mind meanders after fifty years recording sound for Motion Pictures.
  • "Lighting Companies"
    by Robert Allen
    Text of the letter sent to 42 lighting companies. Result of approach to lighting companies reply received from Michael Samuelson.